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Wednesday, May 6, 2020 | History

2 edition of Traditional knowledge in policy and practice found in the catalog.

Traditional knowledge in policy and practice

Suneetha M. Subramanian

Traditional knowledge in policy and practice

approaches to development and human well-being

by Suneetha M. Subramanian

  • 334 Want to read
  • 8 Currently reading

Published by United Nations University Press in New York .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Statementedited by Suneetha M. Subramanian and Balakrishna Pisupati
Classifications
LC ClassificationsGN476.7 .T727 2010
The Physical Object
Paginationp. cm.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL24411721M
ISBN 109789280811919
LC Control Number2010032035
OCLC/WorldCa635493768

Unique, traditional, local knowledge that exists within and is developed around the specific conditions of people indigenous to a particular geographic area in a particular period (Grenier, AU The in-text citation "Grenier, " is not in the reference list. Please correct the citation, add the reference to the list, or delete the citation.   This article talks about traditional knowledge in the Filipino culture, the clash of traditional knowledge and intellectual property rights. The authors then move into ways traditional knowledge can be protected and proposes legal frameworks that can be used to protect individuals and traditional knowledge.

The Confrontation of Modern and Traditional Knowledge Systems in Development. Pat Howard (Simon Fraser University). Abstract: The development project in both capitalist and socialist contexts has augmented the power of technocrats while invalidating alternative knowledge systems rooted in the traditions of local communities, thereby disenfranchising them. Engage traditional knowledge practitioners the same way western knowledge engages scientists and other professionals, to make full use of traditional knowledge and its multi-generational wisdom. Avoid a strategy of including indigenous peoples too late or in a trivial manner; it places both the indigenous people and the project at risk.

Eight Examples of Using Indigenous Knowledge for Urban Biodiversity Author The Nature of policies, plans and bylaws or any other matter the Panel considers of interests of the pacific peoples in Auckland. the traditional knowledge, innovations and practices of indigenous and local communities relevant for the conservation and. Incorporating Traditional Knowledge in Practice. Any attempt, endeavouring to integrate traditional knowledge for biodiversity conservation and sustainability of natural resources should be based on the principle that traditional knowledge often cannot be dissociated from its cultural and institutional setting.


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Traditional knowledge in policy and practice by Suneetha M. Subramanian Download PDF EPUB FB2

A valuable resource to researchers, academics, and policymakers, Traditional Knowledge in Policy and Practice provides a comprehensive overview of TK and its links and contributions to social, economic, environmental, ethical, and political issues.5/5(1). A valuable resource to researchers, academics, and policymakers, Traditional Knowledge in Policy and Practice provides a comprehensive overview of TK and its links and contributions to social.

Traditional knowledge is of interest to a broad range of disciplines and hence this book, for the first time, provides the reader with a book compatible to their needs. As it is emerging as a new and important practice area, this timely work fills a gap in the current existing literature.

Traditional knowledge in policy and practice: Approaches to development and human well-being, Subramanian and Pisupati (eds), United Nations University Press,ISBN 1 Diversities of knowledge communities, their worldviews and sciences: On the challenges of their co-evolution.

Traditional knowledge (TK), the longstanding traditions and practices of certain communities, has contributed immensely to shaping development and human well-being. Its influence spans a variety of sectors, including agriculture, health, education, and governance.

However, TK is increasingly underrepresented or underutilized. A valuable resource to researchers, academics and policymakers, Traditional knowledge in policy and practice provides a comprehensive overview of TK, and its links and contributions to social, economic, environmental, ethical and political issues.

Traditional knowledge in policy and practice: Approaches to development and human well-being, Subramanian and Pisupati (eds), United Nations University Press,ISBN Traditional knowledge in policy and practice: Approaches to development and human well-being Edited by Suneetha M. Subramanian and Balakrishna Pisupati.

incorporate “traditional knowledge” into policy deliberations for some time. A public debate about this practice began in fallwhen Frances Widdowson and Albert Howard published criticisms of the Government of the Northwest Territories’ (GNWT) Traditional Knowledge Policy and of the requirement that traditional knowledge be incorporated.

national and regional systems for the protection of traditional knowledge (policies, laws, information systems and practical tools) and other capacity-building initiatives. Traditional knowledge When community members innovate within the traditional knowledge framework, they may use the patent system to protect their innovations.

56 individuals77 or by some members of a group, or by all members of a group/indigenous community Indeed, the number of persons holding the knowledge does not affect the extent to which this knowledge is distinct and new to the outside world.

However, traditional knowledge can also be spread widely around the world, connected, inter alia, to the spread of genetic resources. The Intellectual Property and the Governance of Traditional Knowledge, Genetic Resources and Traditional Cultural Expressions: Fostering Innovation and Improving Lives project seeks to establish a leading research hub at CIGI offering policy analysis, technical assistance, capacity building and intellectual leadership for the governance of traditional knowledge, genetic resources and.

Traditional knowledge has been defined as 'the cumulative and dynamic body of knowledge, know-how and representations possessed by peoples with long histories of interaction with their natural milieu. A valuable resource to researchers, academics and policymakers, Traditional knowledge in Policy and Practice provides a comprehensive overview of TK, and its links and contributions to social, economic, environmental, ethical and political issues.

Get this from a library. Traditional knowledge in policy and practice: approaches to development and human well-being. [Suneetha M Subramanian; Balakrishna Pisupati;] -- Traditional knowledge (TK) has contributed immensely to shaping development and human well-being.

Its influence spans a variety of sectors, including agriculture, health, education and governance. Description: The book examines the national, regional and international frameworks of protection of traditional knowledge in all regions of the world.

It also discusses options to enhance the existing legal regimes including the use of customary laws and protocols; the adoption of mutual recognition agreements premised on the principle of reciprocity; and the disclosure of source or country of origin.

“Traditional knowledge or ‘local knowledge’ is a record of human achievement in comprehending the complexities of life and survival in often unfriendly environments. Traditional knowledge, which may be technical, social, organizational, or cultural was obtained as part of the great human experiment of survival and development.”.

The Traditional Knowledge Working Group of the Government of the Northwest Territories in Canada was one of the first government policy makers to attempt to define the knowledge of Indigenous peoples, and they came up with this definition of traditional knowledge: Traditional knowledge is knowledge that derives from, or is rooted in the.

knowledge but traditional knowledge is not necessarily indigenous. Traditional knowledge is thus the totality of all knowledge and practices, whether explicit or implicit, used in the management of socio-economic and ecological facets of life.

Including traditional knowledge also allows local community members and elders to share their knowledge with the students and be involved in an effective way of teaching place-based science. Kiosk Development ARM Education and Outreach is committed to integrating traditional knowledge into science education.

is meant by the term ‘traditional knowledge’ and related concepts. A definition offered by the Institute of Advanced Studies Traditional Knowledge Initiative (United Nations University ) suggests that: Traditional knowledge (TK refers to the knowledge, innovations and practices of indigenous and local communities around the world.

Traditional knowledge refers to the knowledge, innovations and practices of indigenous and local communities around the world.

Developed from experience gained over the centuries and adapted to the local culture and environment, traditional knowledge .Chapter A Integrating indigenous knowledge into adaptation policies 5 learning.

They are also diverse, practical, flexible and cost-effective since they use local knowledge, local raw materials, local technicians and local institutions. This knowledge and associated practices were initiated by, and are owned and managed.