Last edited by Nikonris
Thursday, May 14, 2020 | History

4 edition of Garbage! the History & Politics of Trash in New York City found in the catalog.

Garbage! the History & Politics of Trash in New York City

Elizabeth Fee

Garbage! the History & Politics of Trash in New York City

by Elizabeth Fee

  • 34 Want to read
  • 19 Currently reading

Published by New York Public Library .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Engineering - Civil,
  • Technology & Industrial Arts

  • The Physical Object
    FormatPaperback
    Number of Pages96
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL8346146M
    ISBN 100871044374
    ISBN 109780871044372
    OCLC/WorldCa31634203

      New York City's system for collecting and disposing of garbage is exceptionally expensive, and now is the time for the de Blasio Administration to address the problem. The City's contract with sanitation workers has expired, and the new one being negotiated presents an opportunity to fix some of the inefficiencies.   New York would be carved up into zones, companies would make bids to collect the garbage in a given zone, and then the city would pick the winners. In this system, backers have argued, the city could make winning a bid contingent on meeting strict benchmarks for things like safety training, wages, hours or recycling rates.

      Garbage trucks from New York City’s 50 biggest companies are pulled off the road and declared unsafe to drive after 53 percent of government inspections, according to Author: Kiera Feldman.   From Memphis to New York. A native of Pound Ridge, New York, Waring had developed his skills as an agricultural and drainage engineer for New York City.

    Like virtually every metropolis in the world, New York has a trash problem. The city produces approximat tons of it a day. Much of it is carted to landfills in distant places, where it pollutes the soil and water. Worse still: this grossly inefficient system costs the city . Immediately after World War II, New York City became known as one of the world's greatest cities. However, after peaking in population in , the city began to feel the effects of white flight to the suburbs, a downturn in industry and commerce as businesses left for places where it was cheaper and easier to operate, an increase in crime, and an upturn in its welfare burden, all of which.


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Garbage! the History & Politics of Trash in New York City by Elizabeth Fee Download PDF EPUB FB2

Garbage: The History and Politics Of Trash In New York City on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Garbage: The History and Politics Of Trash In New York CityFormat: Paperback.

The people in charge of street cleaning were in the pockets of people like Boss Tweed and Tammany Hall [a corrupt political group that controlled New York City’s Democratic party].

Other cities all over the world had figured out how to solve this waste problem decades earlier, but New York persisted in being infamously, disgustingly dirty. Berkeley Electronic Press Selected Works.

Steven H. Corey and Elizabeth Fee. Garbage. The History and Politics of Trash in New York City. History of Public Health in New York City by John Duffy. Fat of the Land: Garbage of New York — The Last Two Hundred Years by Benjamin Miller.

Gotham Unbound: The Ecological History of Greater New York by Ted Steinberg. Noxious New York: The Racial Politics of Urban Health and Environmental Justice by Julie Sze.

New York produces a lot of trash, partly because the city’s population has grown in the past decade to million people. They produce s tons of trash and recyclables each day. A Brief History of New York City Recycling Inthe New York City Department of Street Cleaning was created in response to the public uproar over litter-lined streets and disorganized garbage collection.

Originally called the Department of Street Cleaning, the agency took over waste responsibilities from the New York City Police Department.

Five Star Carting, the third biggest garbage company in New York City, w customers, has received numerous citations from the New York State Department of Labor for underpayment or. Through most of its history until the mids, New York’s primary method for disposing of its waste was simply to dump it into the ocean.

At one point, as much as 80% of New York’s garbage Author: Max Galka. Interesting run through consumer waste and disposal in New York (and a bit in other US cities). A personal journey with waste, and some interesting personal relationships. Recommended for garbage geeks and anyone concerned with the environment and the impact we (maybe unintentionally) by: by the New York City Tenement House Department.

Courtesy The New York Public Library. porary discussions of public sanitation and municipal solid waste, thanks to its general conceptual sophistication and the richness of the New York Public Li-brary's collections.

Declaring that "a city's history is written in its garbage" and claiming that New. Nelson Molina spent 34 years as a trash man in New York City. He salvaged o items from the garbage, creating a de facto 'trash museum.' He hopes the city.

New York City instituted public-sector garbage management inand other American cities were quick to follow suit. These days our streets are no longer covered in filth, but we throw away a truly unprecedented volume of trash: according to one estimate the average American produces pounds of garbage per day.

The producers of Garbage and the City used waste management as a lens through which to see the history of the city itself. In Catherine McNeur’s lecture “Hog Wash, Swill Milk, and the Politics Author: Emma Wiseman.

The Gritty City. As trashy as New York City can sometimes feel these days, it's nothing compared to what the place was like years ago. Ever since the first Dutch settlers arrived in what would eventually become New York, garbage disposal has been an uphill battle.

Motherboard’s Brian Merchant writes: “New York City creates 33 million tons of waste a year. The next closest offender is Mexico City (the label is missing from the graph above), which.

City of New York. All Rights Reserved, NYC is a trademark and service mark of the City of New York. Privacy Policy. Terms of Use. The “trash” depicted in images that have appeared on garbage cans and train station posters in New York City is of a white middle-aged man with.

This article presents a description on the transportation policy, politics and network in New York State. As the Metropolitan Transit Authority (MTA) and New York State Department of Transportation (NYSDOT) plans confirm, the primary challenge facing New York is the maintenance and improvement of the current transportation infrastructure.

The key transportation issues facing New York State in Cited by: 1. Some politicians and environmentalists in Virginia are alarmed at report that Waste Management Inc plans to ship up to 4, tons a day of New York City garbage.

Less Than A Quarter Of NYC Garbage Is Actual Trash - New York City, NY - Most of what New Yorkers throw away could be recycled somehow, the Department of Sanitation : Noah Manskar.

Every day, New York City routinely expor tons of garbage that its landfills no longer had room for. Most of it was trucked overland hundreds .The mission of Trash Kingpins of New York is to bring transparency and accountability to the for-profit waste industry in New York City.

This site is a project of the following members of the Transform Don’t Trash New York City coalition (list in formation): ALIGN: The Alliance for a Greater New York. Signs claiming to be from the New York City sanitation department are calling Trump supporters and socially-conservative Christians “trash.” Last week, posters appeared all over the Big Apple sporting the message, “Keep NYC Trash Free” with portraits of men and women wearing “Make America Great Again” hats, and holding Chick-Fil-A cups and Bibles.